Comedy Roundtable

KP Anderson

January 18, 2022 BHHcast Season 5 Episode 48
Comedy Roundtable
KP Anderson
Show Notes Transcript

What is the best winning strategy for Monopoly? Can you mess with Scandinavian trolls, and is the Will Farrell and Rachel McAdams classic Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga on the same level as Spinal Tap? If you were to take the mechanical engineering of the perfect joke, how is it built? These and other great lightning round questions are tackled by comedian and producer (but, most importantly, comedian) K.P. Anderson on the Comedy Roundtable.

Producer, writer (and comedian) K.P. Anderson has produced and written for a long list of successful programs including The Keenan Ivory Wayans Show, Politically Incorrect, The Wayne Brady Show, The Soup, The Joel McHale Show and Norm Macdonald Has a Show.  Want to learn more about what it means to be a showrunner like K.P.? Check out Showrunner School Part 1 available on Medium (Link: https://medium.com/the-haven/showrunner-school-part-1-what-is-a-showrunner-f7c14b166e2e). K.P.'s production company Pygmy Wolf Productions is known for its ability to break new ground in the comedy world.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ikpanderson
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ikpanderson/
IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1236421/

Episode Note: This episode was recorded when the Comedy Roundtable was called the BHHcast. 

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People around here trust the shepherds. Jamie. In the other Jamie, they always have the sheep trust her to gather around. I'll throw another log on the fire. Turn it up just a touch with another episode of the podcast is starting now. It is a brand new episode of the podcast starting right now. Jamie Bendel Jamie, Hernan, Adam. Hey, thank you, sir. We have a guest that we have been trying to get on the podcast for some time now and he has a longtime friend and comedian Mr. KP Anderson. Hey, gentlemen, hey, buddy. Hey, what's up? Okay. All right. So KP very simple concept. For this podcast, we ask rapid fire questions, and then we explore the answers there to the very first question is a little bit of a warm up question but sets the tone for the round clockwise or counter clockwise. Oh, clockwise. clockwise, starting with Adam. Alright. KP What do you think is the best winning monopoly strategy? Hmm. drink heavily steal from your neighbors bank? Yeah, that's a good call. Make sure everybody else drinks heavily. I think my tenants are drunk. Yes. Alright, so a recall has been issued for the fragrance line CoCoRaHS. And the company that makes it has hired you to develop a replacement pitches on the new fragrance. Oh, they recalled co cores and they've hired me. Alright, we're going with a wider audience. We're going to we're going to take down the price we are changing into crack horse. We are. We are going we're going everywhere. We're getting in every neighborhood with it. It should be around for at least a decade moving to crack whores. It's got fresh sense like parking lot. That's right. At dumpster. That's right. out behind the convenience store. Alright, this isn't a question that I asked often, but I feel like it's a good one to ask of you. Is it better to share how you really feel about somebody when they can hear it? See it, appreciate it or wait and have a regret that it's too late? That is a great question. I think that situationally dependent and you know, it's interesting that my mind winters, the negative of how you feel about somebody, mostly because my wife has a brother. But then all of a sudden, I thought about Bob Saget. And I thought, No, I think that you let them know as soon as you possibly can. If positive or negative. It matters that that be the takeaway from your time together. Excellent. Do you mind if I edit that? That is a great question part F to go after my CoCoRaHS question, or do you prefer still goes after? With Jamie? Yeah, no, I don't mind that as long as I can. As long as I can put like some sort of a copyright on crack course. Yes. We'll work on the trademark for you. What is the best TV series and there's a caveat here to watch with a child returning from college to binge watch with a child from college? What would be the best TV series to binge watch with a child returned from college? I would say likely depends on the child and what they're into. The one that we did binge watch together that we loved was the Witcher on Netflix. Okay. But I have a math science fantasy book reading nerd have a daughter who way like she and I go way down that road and my wife acts like she doesn't and then she's the one who's saying we got to watch the Witcher tonight. Excellent Witcher I'm in. Alright, you have one song to perform for the Air Guitar World Championships later this year in Finland. Which song do you choose? Jessie's Girl? It's actually the right answer. Yeah, yeah, that queued up ready to go. You knew that you probably follow the tour of the Yeah. My audition tape is in. We'll just see how I do. Here comes Finland. I actually will say until I watched whatever that movie was about Eurovision? Yeah. Oh, yeah. I thought that that was just a goof. I didn't know that. That was actually a thing. I didn't either. Yeah, it's the first I learned. Yeah, yeah. By the way, that is a great movie. It's like it is so weird. And it is so trippy for so long. But then you think about how they sort of inhabit the spirit of the weirdness of that whole competition and the care and you go oh my god, they actually wrote a really well thought out heartfelt movie about this. That also happens to be absurdly absurdly absurdly funny. I would say it actually punches for its weight against a movie like Spinal Tap like that. I agree. It's that well done. Wow. Yeah, yeah. I also learned the trolls live in trees. I didn't know that. But from watching that movie Trolls are very, you do not want to mess with trolls. That whole Scandinavian troll. You know, Greenland, Iceland. Scandinavian troll thing. Do not mess around. I know. We're getting a little off topic. And I have my last question. Yes, but I do follow Hello, cheapskate Scandinavian homes. Oh, Instagram, not homes. Is that what you said? Home? Okay, good. Yeah. And there are some beautiful, inexpensive properties. Oh my gosh, over there in the greater Scandinavian area. Okay, hold on a second. Are we gonna? Why are we not living there? Like, let's I mean, I get it the winters are long and dark but you don't have to go you could go somewhere only one of my thoughts was always like, do you get in on the socialized the whole socialized medicine and everything if you just arrived? Like if I didn't pay into the system all these years can I just come there late in the game and get all the benefits? I believe so. So I think that seems brilliant to me like maybe I stopped saving for retirement. Yeah, well, I think you got to get the citizenship and then yeah, oh, yeah. Okay. Yeah, I honestly think the way you post it is like, do whatever you want in life, and then at the end, get in and get all the benefits. I think that's a little bit how a lot of religions work. Very last minute, you could say I'm super, super sorry. And they're like, Okay, come on, you're forgiven. You get all the benefits. Yeah, it's good. You know, we're not even gonna give you a probationary period of eternity. Don't you worry about it. Right. Yeah. Although Jamie, you're a theologian on the thing. There is probably that whole little area that technically is like probation. Not if you die in Scandinavia. Oh, there's a there's a different right path. Yeah, that's a holla I think is why they do it there is that? Yeah, yeah. All right. My turn for a final question little bit also music related put yourself back in your cassette mixtape shoes. Who is the anchor artist on the romantic mixtape you created to express an emotion you had been unable to express yourself to a target thing at this point at that point in time. I think that the anchor to that is going to be a later era. REO Speedwagon. Like it's not going to be like a high fidelity, it's not going to be a keep on loving you or something like that. Because that was that was sort of written a little bit more. Again, my cassette tape era, I was like 18 years old at the at the very tail end when I was really there and DJing at the world on wheels, a roller skating rink in in Cambridge, Minnesota. And so I think it was going to be I'm trying to think, of course, I'm blanking on on what song I'm trying to think of. I Can't Fight This Feeling anymore by REO Speedwagon, who started as friendship growing stronger. I only wish I had the strength to let it show Boom shaka laka. Exactly. Yeah, in your first and that's how I felt about Kirby Puckett and the Minnesota Twins. Alright, that's gonna do it for our first segment here on the podcast, our guest, comedian KP Anderson, we will be back in just a moment. In game strategy, is there a class of competitions where get drunk and isn't a possible path to winning? is not impossible. So he was saying monopoly? Yeah, get drunk. Get drunk. Just so many. Chutes and Ladders. Get Hungry Hungry Hippos get drunk in the hand grab. Yeah, hippos. Yeah. I don't think you can win. A Twister for Scrabble just requires Ronk Scrabble. Yeah. Oh, my goodness. Wait, wait. So check this out. I found in the back of a closet in my childhood home a Ziploc bag full of Oh, balderdash definitions, okay? And we used to in college play balderdash. And the whole purpose of the answers was just to make the other people laugh. So there was never an attempt to win to win to actually write a definition of the word. It was just who could write the funniest I love that definite, which is the way those games should be played. Which is how you're supposed to play that game, right? The only thing more fun than playing a game that way writing answers that way is if you're playing with someone who was there for serious balderdash and watch him there react so upset with you guys like messing up the game? Yeah, how you play the game. It would be a fun game to play even with us. Yeah, it'd be a fun easy way to do it. The third episode. Yeah, it would be fun to play even with us, even with you. With you. It's that fun. I could even play I know. would suck. Yeah, but this one this one I could tell. You would be amazing. There's a guy I want to play games with. And that's KP. And I don't think we'd even have to have balderdash to have fun with KP would and in excellent balderdash drunk balderdash. Let's go check it out. Back with more of the podcast right now. Jamie, Jamie and Adam our guest KP Anderson. Okay, so this segment we're KP we're gonna talk a little bit more. This is kind of get to know KP a little portion of the show. We were talking you made mention of Minnesota. In your last response there. Roll the wheels, the classic roller rink, no first place did you do all skate? Now reverse. Oh yeah, I actually got dismissed from that job. I was very popular DJ, there was my first public speaking job. And I got dismissed from that job on a Sunday afternoon church skate where I was in a bit of a tiff with a manager who also happened to be my girlfriend and I put on AC DC back in black and I wouldn't turn it off. Yeah. And that was back in the day when AC DC was double worship music. Yeah, you did on Sunday skate? Yeah, but all the church folk were out there having a good old time. Yeah, they loved it. Yeah. And she finally fired me. So I broke up with her. How many therapy sessions do you think have involved in awakening or reference back to that moment when they thought they were going to a church session and they heard back in black at the skate rink, right? Like I don't know, I in my life took a change. I'm trying to put, you know, it really kind of happened when I was skating, and then they lost the Lord that day. Just felt my soul leave my body. I think that's I think there was a way to skate do the reverse skate the lyric plate backwards? That's when I think of Minnesota though I have I have a theory about people when I meet you at a party. And there's there's a good guy points and, and bad guy points. And I'm not saying you can't overwhelm these points. But when people from Minnesota I usually give a plus one to my theory on it is that it gets so cold in Minnesota, that you have to spend time with other people in close proximity. And you just kind of have to figure out how to get along. Yeah, I think I think well, there's some truth is everybody's everybody every year spends five months in a COVID bubble, right? So KB I do want I think your story is kind of an interesting one came to LA as a comedian, touring, growing your career doing whatever. And then you had an opportunity to kind of shift into the production side of things. And you have really kind of a remarkable resume of the comedians that you've worked with and some of the projects that you've been involved with. So how did that come about? You know, I think what happened was, you know, when you and I first met Jamie, I was so I was so new to LA. And I was I had been in Minnesota, I had been a stand up with a bullet, you know, like I went very quickly from my first open mic. Well, I was a sophomore in college, to getting hired to be the house emcee at one of the big clubs up in Minnesota, and there were there was a chain of them. So I worked like 45 weeks a year, almost from the first time I did stand up. One of the things that was very good about coming up at that time in the early 90s. Was there a lot of great men in Minneapolis was a very big stand up scene, especially for touring comics. And so I was since I was the host emcee at these comedy galleries in downtown Minneapolis and St. Paul, I was always working with these great big name comics who you know, now, you know, are unfortunately either no longer with us or, you know, household name stars. And so I very early on in my career, I worked with, you know, Bill Hicks and Jerry Seinfeld and and norm and, and Bill Maher and Rita Rudner, and Paula Poundstone. And Ellen and all these people and and Roseanne, and they all seem to take some manner of investment in my writing, like they thought I was a good or good enough stand up and they always complimented that. But they kept thinking that there was something very unique about my writing. And the late Robert Schimmel was probably the was probably the one who was the most like he and I spent the two week run in Gulfport Mississippi together playing and casino in the middle of August where we literally fundamentally went insane. But But Robert taught me how to really like uncover everything with a joke. It wasn't enough to just have one joke about one thing. It was like you're trying to build time and you're trying to build theory. And so you've got to roll over another stone and you don't get to tell that joke until you read a joke after it you know, and you know, and he really taught me the discipline of writing in that regard. And so the writing part of it became sort of the first cornerstone of it that then led to you know, I got my first job from Keenan Ivory Wayans on his late night talk show. I Keenan literally treated me like a baseball player for a player to be named later to Bill Maher to work on politically correct. And that's where you know, and that's where that part of my career really took off. I my first joke on the air was the night the Monica Lewinsky scandal broke. And I did and I did nine solid months of kind of being like bills you know, Monaco's Jewish mothers upset the president wasn't a doctor kind of kind of gold so if you don't mind and I and it's okay if you say hey I'm that's not really something to come talk to me about a project as unique as norms talk show. No, I don't mind at all. I do think after you know, after Bob's super untimely passing the other day, he and Norm were such good friends. And I knew both of them probably better in the context of each other at a certain point than I knew each of them individually. So the biggest thing but just this is kind of an aside thought It's just something I was thinking about today. But I just keep thinking that like somewhere norm right now is with Bob looking at Facebook going would you take a fucking picture with everybody the the experience with Norm stock show it's such a it's so we were doing the Joel McHale show at Netflix at the same time. And I got called by Netflix we literally just closed the deal with Joel for with Netflix for the Joel show. And it was myself Joel and Paul Feig who took that in and sold it but I was being run through my company, pygmy wolf productions. And, and so Netflix called and said and said, hey, you know, we have this project with norm that it needs, it needs a production company, we need somebody to we need somebody to oversee it. And we ran a whole bunch of names by norm. And he said, You know, when you're came up, he said, I always like that KP Anderson guy. So we thought that maybe you go meet with Norm and if you guys hit it off and it works, then then then you come in and do that in conjunction with what you're doing with Joel and we did it on the same soundstage and, and we shared a lot of facilities and stuff which saved Netflix some money along the way. The one thing that I will never attempt to take credit for is the is the comedic quality of that show uniquely. Because while I worked on the bookings with him and while I certainly suggested stuff and sometimes a joke, made it in or a question made it in or anything else, Norm was such a and he had a great team of writers around him that he really that were the guys who he worked with on Weekend Update and anatomia who was on it, and there was and there was a there was a tighter group of people who were the nucleus of that show. And I was doing Joel's show and running that and obviously Joel and I had our you know, had our at our relationship. So I was it really was sort of like I was invited along to help smooth grease, the grease the runway to get the show in, you know if there's any silver lining after his passing is it wasn't received very well when it first came out. But after his passing, a lot of people have watched the show and now it gets a lot of acclaim. I'm grateful now that it's being seen for how normes brain you know, maneuvered through that show and one thing that he also now that people really liked the show or not, at least his fans know it's there and are finding it. The other thing that he gets a ton of credit for and Lloyd Laurie Joe Hoekstra who was the executive the actual showrunner on the show they get they get a ton of credit they sat through post on that show and you know, we were shooting sometimes to our interviews and they turned it into something that reflected his outlook and reflected him against all the hard hard to make it Alright, so we're gonna be back with more of the podcast and our guest comedian KP Anderson right after this so we're heading down the path to changing the name of the podcast although that's a legit allegedly allegedly is going to likely turn into actually okay and so we just want to make sure that the sheep follow us they don't get lost the name will change but the show will remain the same thing people saying great yes are you manifesting a name change yeah I'm trying to think how does allegedly turn into actually oh just watch it's coming I mean life is full change always changing changes okay, I knew that we were due for a name change as soon as we started hiring show consultants consultants they had come in and listen to a couple episodes and then tell you what to do and create infighting among the foes tension name change the name change the logo and get rid of JB I don't care which was I thought it was pretty ballsy to say in the report more Adams especially since you're out numbering me due to what I thought I was like what he what are you getting it? Yeah, it's weird because my mom was the consultant so that was awkward. That's why she threw that in. I'm open to feedback. We are always I ultimately trust the listeners. I also think that our listeners are mature enough and they like us enough to follow us into this new exciting arena that we're about to get into. Same show same gonna be great keep an eye out new name coming soon possible. Allegedly, actually. All right back with our next of the Lightning Rounds here on the podcast Jamie Jamie and Adam our guest KP Anderson. Alright, KP we give the question of the option rather to you back clockwise or counterclockwise, still clockwise, I move forward the job deal clockwise starting with that. Well, my question is actually going to take you back. So unfortunately, tomorrow you passed away. And the good news is though you get to come back, but you get to come back as a Viking, a hun or concrete keys to door which one do you come back as just on the outside chance that someone gets it wrong. Come back as a Vikings place kicker. That's it Good keys the door Okay, I want that mustache. I want that jawline. Right on. I want that hair right on some Cydia gold on your request. Yeah, yeah, I wish comedian would you want with you on a secret mission to infiltrate and overthrow a foreign government? Doug Stanhope mostly because I just want Doug Stanhope on any kind of mission that I could go on. But I also think that if you're truly going to overthrow you want it you you you want the end result to be a party and you want the people in your in your corner to be to be open minded about things. Okay, Katie, you have one opportunity to take your child to a pivotal moment in sports. What is the moment I think the moment is a 1987 World Series game seven against St. Louis Cardinals last out of game seven so that my kid can a see just how much emotion I'm capable of in a positive sense. And, and also, just what it feels like for an entire community to come together around a positive moment in a way that captures your imagination. Yeah, we're gonna stay on the theme of Minnesota good people. So one thing I noticed about people who do stay in the cold, they play cards a lot people they like to play cards. What in your mind is the best card game in my in my current mind frame Texas Hold'em is the best card game because I like to gamble. I love to play. I love to play at that level in that game chance I think I think the Minnesota side of me would still go to cribbage. Because that to me, Father, Son bonding, mother, son bonding, Brother, brother bonding. That's our cabin in northern Minnesota. And that's, you know, that's every time it rained. That's what we did. That's awesome. So the President has issued an executive order today naming you as the new head of the US military. And the President was asked why why you and President said that it was your idea for a new branch of the military that's sold him on and pointing you what is that new branch of the military that you're proposing? Wow, we'd force we'd force just like, hey, let's all sit down. Just put on a movie. We'll do some Mel Brooks. If at the end of this, you still want to kill me? We'll fight. Right. Exactly. Alright, so then last question is if you are going to construct it, and I don't mean subject matter, necessarily, I'm not asking you to tell it. But you have a daughter who's in a engineering, mechanical engineering. So if you were to take the mechanical engineering of the perfect, Joe, how was it built? Ooh, that is a good question was a really good question. And I don't know that there is a, that there is an exact answer to that. I do know, that there's, I do know that there's a there's a a, a sort of, for me, a perfect reaction, like I still love against popular mores. I still love a great, you know, like, push it and see if it wobbles, you know, socially challenging joke. I'm back up doing stand up myself some nowadays. And, and I and I don't, I don't, I don't see myself as the angry young man that I was, you know, years ago when I was doing it, you know, 4550 weeks a year. And I search for ways to I search for ways to construct a joke that that has shock value that also has, like some sense of logic that you can't argue, but also ultimately, like triggers the laugh in a way that you just can't deny it you just I think the best I think one of the best jokes that I ever wrote I don't think it's perfect job. But one of the best jokes that I ever wrote is about having a having 105 year old grandmother my grandmother passed at 105 years old. And and at the end of a long run of a joke the blow to it is you know the hardest part about having a relative that old is the holidays because it's always what do you get? What do you get someone who's 103 104 105 years old for Christmas? You get them something you really want but could live without for five maybe six months that grand grand flat screen TV is that Vizio shit Grammy you keep that in the box I love the architecture of that joke because it poses a quandary that no one was thinking about walking into the room. Right right. And you're talking about something that every time you talk about someone living to be that old it be gets applause and it gets this sort of like great, you know this great like flowing of like, Wow, isn't that something and I think it's the comics job to go not really Yeah, right. They can kind of rip it from you. Alright, so, okay, so then let me take a shot at what you've described. Okay. Yeah, the the elements of a perfect joke are relatability logic shock and surprise with the true and Yeah, funny that's unique to the teller of the joke. Yes, I think that's a that that's a that's an instrumental part of it as well right right all right so that brings us to a close of our conversation here with I keep saying comedian but really I don't want to say you're not a comedian but I weirdly I think I think you know if if one thing had to sit on the headstone that's the one that matters the most to me still good. And I think that and I think that if I can be just verbose for one more second do a sort of the thing that might have gotten lost along the way with me because you know, I moved into this other thing before before YouTube I never did the HBO special I never did the other stuff but I think like if they if they say a lot about me, you know nice guy good dad. Whatever else funny motherfucker is the one that I'd love. To be to be spoken early and often Okay, another Minnesotan that I want to be best friends with. I want to get my aspect to Atlanta I went right back down good all right, we definitely will share a fight when you come. Alright, so easy to find online KP Anderson, any projects to plug? Yeah, if people can, if people can look at one thing for me medium.com Go, go see the stuff that I'm writing there. That's my my project of passion right now. And it's going to lead to I've got I've got a show coming up for History channel that I'm not allowed to talk about yet. That's gonna premiere in March, or April sometime around then and, and on medium.com There's stuff that I'm writing now. And I'm going to be releasing that's leading to sort of a more retrospective of my life and career and hopefully being part of an educational thing for people who want to get into this business. So so check that out there and that'll and that'll lead you down a trail to some other stuff. Perfect, awesome. Awesome. All right, on behalf of Jamie, Jamie and Adam, and our guest KP Anderson, thank you gentlemen. So great to see you. Thanks, JP was a lot of fun. Take care do buddy. Alright, so that's gonna wrap it up for this episode of the podcast for Jamie Jamie and Adam our guests this episode KP Anderson. Don't wander too far. There'll be brand new content before you know it taka taka fires getting low. This episode of the podcast is over. Dumb to gold now. Back to where you came from. Will call you back. It's time for another podcast. Talking